Posts tagged facebook

I guess I’d be angry at this if my Instagram weren’t a terrible spectacle of truly awful photography. Good luck selling them, u guise.

I guess I’d be angry at this if my Instagram weren’t a terrible spectacle of truly awful photography. Good luck selling them, u guise.

So no one’s going to write about much of anything today except for the Facebook public offering. If you’re a company with some terrible news that needs to be released, I’d suggest doing it in a few hours.

So no one’s going to write about much of anything today except for the Facebook public offering. If you’re a company with some terrible news that needs to be released, I’d suggest doing it in a few hours.

We were able to better predict a student’s academic success based on their Facebook page than on the cognitive tests.
Don Kluemper of Northern Illinois University. His research suggests a person’s Facebook page can reliably predict job performance and academic success.
Irony: I can’t load a story from my Facebook news feed which is about how Facebook’s acquisition of Instagram is doomed because none of Facebook’s apps work.

Irony: I can’t load a story from my Facebook news feed which is about how Facebook’s acquisition of Instagram is doomed because none of Facebook’s apps work.

So Facebook is no longer asserting—at least legally—that the emails are fake.
Business Insider’s Henry Blodgett, on the matter of Ceglia v. Zuckerberg

The ill-fated anti-Google whisper campaign I linked to yesterday has today become a full-blown crisis — both for the company funding the campaign (Facebook, naturally) and its PR firm, Burson Marsteller.

There are some good ways to conduct a whisper campaign — which is just an insidery term for when a company tries to get influential people to write contrarian things about another company without having adequate news to support whatever the contrarian claims are — and then there are bad ways. A good way is to make a compelling case for the article while also being straightforward and truthful. It’s a hit-or-miss craft, not a science.

A bad way is to conceal who your client is and then give an unsolicited offer to ghostwrite — which itself is ridiculous, as the best writer in the world can’t effectively ghost for a complete stranger. Concealing a client’s identity is an ethical no-no in public relations and public affairs. The word for it is “astroturfing.”

If Facebook demanded Burson pitch stories on behalf of an anonymous client, then it is at fault. If Burson tried to execute a routine PR engagement in unethical ways, then it is at fault.

Right now, both companies look really shady.

It’ll be worth watching as Facebook continues to influence how readers experience reporting and journalism. TechCrunch today reported on Trove, the Washington-Post-owned “social news site”:

The news site factors in a reader’s likes and dislikes, combining algorithms with ‘expertise from the newsroom’ (news of the day selected by an editorial team).

Trove takes advantage of Facebook Connect to pull in a user’s interests as outlined by his or her Facebook profile to help jump start the personalization part of the equation.

Does giving one particular platform that level of control over content delivery strike anyone else as a not-so-good idea, or am I just missing something?

Milner, the 49-year-old founder of Internet investment firm Digital Sky Technologies and chairman of Mail.ru Group, has no immediate plans to move into the mansion, spokesman Leonid Solovyev told The AP. Solovyev and another spokesman for the billionaire declined any further comment.
Facebook investor and Russian billionaire pays $100m for house.

Looking for an effective way to get your name in the tech press without doing anything even remotely newsworthy? Say something ridiculous! Like this claim that Facebook could soon become the “most valuable company in the world.”

Goldman Facebook Pitch Or Nigerian Email Scam? : Planet Money : NPR

life20:

Goldman Sachs recently emailed wealthy clients who might be interested in investing in Facebook. The WSJ’s Deal Journal got a peek at the email — and noticed a a striking resemblance to the language in a Nigerian email scam.

Goldman’s message begins:

When you have a chance I wanted to find a time to discuss a highly confidential and time sensitive investment opportunity in a private company …

For confidentiality reasons, I am unable to tell you the name of the company unless you agree not to use such information other than in connection with your evaluation of the investment opportunity and to keep all information that we reveal to you strictly confidential.

And, for comparison, here’s a Nigerian email quoted by Deal Journal:

FIRST, I MUST SOLICIT YOUR STRICTEST CONFIDENCE IN THIS TRANSACTION. THIS IS BY VIRTUE OF ITS NATURE AS BEING UTTERLY CONFIDENTIAL AND ‘TOP SECRET’. I AM SURE AND HAVE CONFIDENCE OF YOUR ABILITY AND RELIABILITY TO PROSECUTE A TRANSACTION OF THIS GREAT MAGNITUDE INVOLVING A PENDING TRANSACTION REQUIRING MAXIIMUM CONFIDENCE.