Posts tagged tech

Please do not write that I compared the Manhattan Project to Uber.
Valleywag’s Sam Biddle is the subject of this New York Magazine profile.

How the NSA Almost Killed the Internet

In a sense, the tech companies [targeted] are more like the NSA than they would like to think. Both have seized on the progress in computing, communications, and storage to advance their respective missions. (When you think of it, Google’s original mission statement—“to collect and organize the world’s information”—might also apply to the activity at Fort Meade.) Both have sought to fulfill those missions by amassing huge troves of personal information—and both offer trade-offs that seemingly justify the practice. Google, Facebook, and others argue that they can use that information to improve the lives of their customers far in excess of any discomfort that may come from sharing that data. The NSA believes that it’s necessary to draw on that information to prevent a replay of 9/11 or worse. Both have established elaborate self-policing procedures to minimize abuse and claim to strictly follow the external constraints that limit their activities. When either makes a mistake, it invariably vows to do better—at least when its overreaches become public. Of course, the comparison goes only so far. If the NSA doesn’t connect the dots, the door is open to catastrophe.

Not a single breakthrough product was unveiled.
Christopher Mims (@mims): 2013 was a lost year for tech
We stand by our product.

A spokesperson for Coin, a product that digitally consolidates users’ credit and bank card information so they only have to carry one piece of plastic. But the product’s terms of service states: “You are solely responsible for your own losses or losses incurred by Coin and others due to any unauthorized use of your account.” So if the company’s data isn’t secure, apparently that’s the users’ fault.

And there are other problems with this solution that’s in search of a problem, too.

Business Insider: Google now bigger than all newspapers and magazines combined:

It’s won’t be long now, in other words, before Google not only eclipses magazines but also becomes bigger than magazines ever were — even when there was no Internet to compete with.

That’s staggering.

Related: The number of newspeople — reporters, editors, columnists, etc. — working in the U.S. decreased 41 percent from 2000 to 2010, according to Labor Department data.  Which is also staggering.

Business Insider: Google now bigger than all newspapers and magazines combined:

It’s won’t be long now, in other words, before Google not only eclipses magazines but also becomes bigger than magazines ever were — even when there was no Internet to compete with.

That’s staggering.

Related: The number of newspeople — reporters, editors, columnists, etc. — working in the U.S. decreased 41 percent from 2000 to 2010, according to Labor Department data. Which is also staggering.

I always start with Facebook.
A competitive intelligence consultant, or what some might call a corporate spy, describes what he does and how he does it in Inc. magazine.
I guess I’d be angry at this if my Instagram weren’t a terrible spectacle of truly awful photography. Good luck selling them, u guise.

I guess I’d be angry at this if my Instagram weren’t a terrible spectacle of truly awful photography. Good luck selling them, u guise.

More on using Wikipedia to predict who Romney’s VP nominee will be:

The only way that could work is to monitor all of the likely picks on an hourly basis to track their updates against one another. It’s likely that the Romney campaign will attempt to scrub Wikipedia of distasteful information on the nominee right before the announcement’s made, and we don’t know when that will be.

Still, that data is only an indicator; the best that it gets media outlets is baseless speculation that isn’t of any use to actual reporting. This is why no right-minded editor will dedicate any resources at all to the refresh-Wikipedia-all-day-and-keep-a-running-Google-Docs-spreadsheet-of-the-number-of-edits-and-who-made-them beat.

A neat alternative for an enterprising media outlet would be to have a programmer build something akin to a real-time index that automates figures about edits to profiles. Alternatively, outlets could just slap a question-mark after a speculative headline or the wretched “UNCONFIRMED” disclaimer before it, but I doubt this will happen. Maybe I’m naive.

On the flipside, if I had the privilege of working for or with Wikipedia, I’d recommend they develop a real-time index of edits made to the profiles of those thought to be up for the GOP VP nomination, since they can probably automate those updates quicker than a lot of folks and, unlike media outlets, aren’t encumbered by all the other parts of the news cycle that need attention.

Media outlets that follow this Tumblr: Is any of this inaccurate/unfair? Programmers who follow this Tumblr: Is such automation possible/easy?

Irony: I can’t load a story from my Facebook news feed which is about how Facebook’s acquisition of Instagram is doomed because none of Facebook’s apps work.

Irony: I can’t load a story from my Facebook news feed which is about how Facebook’s acquisition of Instagram is doomed because none of Facebook’s apps work.

thenextweb:

Ben Lang of Wibiya and Sivan Cohen of Conduit have come up with this graphic that neatly sums up the readerships of some of the world’s most popular tech blogs. (via Typical Readers of Top Tech Blogs Revealed! - The Next Web)

thenextweb:

Ben Lang of Wibiya and Sivan Cohen of Conduit have come up with this graphic that neatly sums up the readerships of some of the world’s most popular tech blogs. (via Typical Readers of Top Tech Blogs Revealed! - The Next Web)